Posted by tac_admin, October 22, 2014

Top 5 Blog Posts on BA Leadership

<alt="BA Leadership"/>Now that autumn has turned the world into an array of pumpkins, it’s time to reflect on this past summer.

During those hotter months, I wrote about BA leadership, and what it means to the analysts who want to reach higher positions.

As always, I remain committed to providing you with all of the resources, strategies, and facts you need to become the best business analyst you can.

I’ve chosen 5 of my favorite articles—all of which have something to do with leadership, and how you can step into the role with ease and success.

The Forgotten BA Skillset: Assertiveness

Is it assertiveness or candor that a business analyst needs to create a transformative solution?

When it comes to bad processes and faulty systems, there’s a deep need for brutal honesty when a clinker throws your clients off the success track.

One of your most important business analyst skills is not only offering comprehensive solutions, but you must also be honest about what needs to be done to solve the problem.

Click here to keep reading.

IIBA-Endorsed Training: Get It Paid For

When it comes to your accelerated success as a business analyst, you have to stay consistently on top of your game. That means, of course, getting the IIBA-endorsed training required for you to perform at your top level.

When I talk to business analysts from all over the country, many feel as if they have to pay to work. Shouldn’t it be the other way around? While the BA training you receive will increase your income faster than you may have thought possible, the initial cost may come as a blow.

To begin, if you can’t find a way to get your classes covered, there are many affordable options for IIBA-endorsed training out there. Of course, it never hurts to ask your company for reimbursement.

Click here to keep reading.

Six Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be the Leader in Your BA Projects

As a business analyst, you’re a leader.

It’s a hard pill to swallow, and sometimes it’s better to be a follower instead. The way I see it, there are six important reasons why. Here are some compelling reasons why you shouldn’t always lead your own BA projects

Click here to keep reading.

Do Clients and Colleagues Take Your BA Skills Seriously?

Do you ever feel as if you constantly have to impress in order to be seen as a successful business analyst?

You do have to impress in order to gain respect, a higher salary, and a senior-level position. It’s true. But you don’t have to put on some sort of show to prove you have what it takes.

If you feel as if your stakeholders and colleagues don’t respect your business analyst skillsets, you might be worried that you’ll have to pull out all the stops.

And then your stress levels will rise to level 11.

Let’s face it: sometimes you won’t get the respect you know you deserve, but 99% of the time, you can take steps to help your colleagues and clients see the incredible value in what you offer.

Click here to keep reading.

Communication Practices that Lead to Senior Level BA Positions

Your success as a BA depends in large part on the effectiveness of your communication. Let’s face it: communication is a cornerstone, especially in business analysis.

In any number of industries, strong leadership often hinges on conveying information clearly to the people who need to hear it.

If you’re a business analyst who wants to climb to a senior level position, strong communication practices go doubly for you.

Click here to keep reading.

Feel like we missed an important article? Post your favorite in the comments!


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